Destiny’s Child Gives The Fans What They Want With Cute Reunion Photo

Beyoncé may be about to give birth to twins any minute now, but she still made time to reunite with her fellow independent women. 

On Friday, the singer shared a series of photos on Instagram from Kelly Rowland’s Whoa, Baby! book launch at The Grove in Los Angeles, which took place on Wednesday. 

The first three photos show Bey, dressed in an oversized blush-pink dress with flowing sleeves and a pair of tight over-the-knee boots. She accessorized with drop earrings and oversized sunglasses. She’s definitely nailing this whole maternity style thing. 

Bey was, of course, there with fellow Destiny’s Child members Rowland and Michelle Williams. The trio made sure to satisfy fans’ thirst for the supergroup and pose for a cute photo, complete with a Whoa Baby! filter. 

A post shared by Beyoncé (@beyonce) on

Fuck Cancer founder and CEO Yael Braun, hosted the book launch, and Rowland took to Instagram to thank Braun for hosting the event. “Thank you for being there and sharing you intelligence, humor, wit, and beauty with us all! I adore you!” Rowland wrote.

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Margaret Atwood Responds To Cast’s Claim That ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Isn’t A Feminist Story

It’s difficult to talk about “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Hulu’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s famous dystopia, without bringing up the story’s eerie relevance to contemporary politics. It is, after all, centered on a dictatorial regime hellbent on policing women’s bodies.

This was certainly the case during a panel discussion at Tribeca Film Festival on Friday night, during which many of the show’s cast and crew were asked how they felt about the political aspects of the series, set to premiere on April 26. When asked whether or not the story’s feminist themes in particular were part of the reason some of the actors were attracted to the project, the answers were somewhat surprising. 

“Any story about a powerful woman owning herself in any way is automatically deemed feminist,” Madeline Brewer, who plays handmaid Janine, told audiences after a screening of the show’s first episode. “This is a story about a woman. I don’t think this is feminist propaganda. I think this is a story about women and about humans. The three people hanging on the wall were all men. This story affects all people.”

“I really echo what Maddie said before,” Elizabeth Moss, who plays Offred, said. “It’s not a feminist story, it’s a human story, because women’s rights are human rights. I never intended to play Peggy [from ‘Mad Men’] as a feminist and I never expected to play Offred as a feminist.”

A few members of the audience, including MTV culture writer Rachel Handler, took to Twitter to express their concern with Moss and Brewer’s claims.

In response, another Twitter user thought it wise to see what Atwood, the keeper of the source material, thought:

Atwood didn’t necessarily refute the cast’s claim, but rather edited it to be more in line with a human rights-centric definition of feminism, one that many contemporary feminists already adhere to.

“It’s not only a feminist story,” she’d have them say, “it’s also a human story.”

In an earlier essay for The New York Times titled “Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Means in the Age of Trump,” the author weighed in on whether or not she considered her novel to be feminist.

[I]s “The Handmaid’s Tale” a “feminist” novel? If you mean an ideological tract in which all women are angels and/or so victimized they are incapable of moral choice, no. If you mean a novel in which women are human beings — with all the variety of character and behavior that implies — and are also interesting and important, and what happens to them is crucial to the theme, structure and plot of the book, then yes. In that sense, many books are “feminist.”

Moss has taken a similar position in past interviews. On stage on Friday, she described her character’s actions and thoughts as being motivated simply by a desire to survive and reunite with her daughter ― not necessarily a cemented vision of feminism.

“For me, I don’t approach anything with a political agenda,” she added. “I approach it from a very human place, I hope.”

While several members of the cast seemed less willing to discuss politics point blank during the Tribeca panel, Ann Dowd, who plays a complex villain in “Handmaid’s Tale,” did not mince words. When asked what kind of impact she’d like the show to have on viewers. “I hope it has a massive effect on people,” she said. “I hope they picket the White House and I hope they’re wearing [’Handmaid’s Tale’] costumes.”

Her advice to fans who want to view “The Handmaid’s Tale” as a politically-charged warning was made clear: “Stay awake. Stay awake. And don’t for a minute think, well, I’ll get involved some other time. I won’t worry about the midterm election. I’ll just… no, no, no. Don’t wait. Just stay awake.”

type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related… + articlesList=58fb61a3e4b00fa7de14b77d,58e7de23e4b058f0a02f0adb,58eb8840e4b00de141050bef,58d034bee4b0ec9d29de74f5,58989258e4b0c1284f26ea2a,58d916f1e4b03787d35a6294,58c05330e4b0ed7182696155,58bf30a7e4b0d1078ca1f754

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Adorable Portraits Explore The Lives Of Big-City Shop Cats

Tamar Arslanian knows that shop cats aren’t just cute, they can play a vital role in a city like New York that can feel a bit cold and brutal at times.

It all started when she started posting photos of two shop cats in her neighborhood — Jack, who lives at a wine shop and Kitty, who resides at a pilates studio — on social media, and was overwhelmed by the enthusiasm and interest of her fellow New Yorkers. Many of them had favorite local shop cats of their own.

“It’s then I began to realize how pervasive shop cats were in the city, and the important role they played in adding a touch of warmth – a sense of community even – in a place that can sometimes feel overwhelming and impersonal,” she told HuffPost in an email.

That realization inspired Arslanian to write “Shop Cats of New York,” a book that explores the lesser-known lives of the city’s most adored felines. She teamed up with photographer Andrew Marttila, who shot gorgeous portraits of the book’s furry stars.

Arslanian had some important criteria for which cats she included.

“First and foremost, I wanted to to feel confident the cats were well cared for and beloved,” she said.

As it turns out, she was pleasantly surprised by just how great the cats’ lives seemed to be.

“My biggest ‘ah ha’ was realizing the level of stimulation and attention these cats received in comparison to most house cats, mine included,” she said. “I see my cats for about an hour before work and a few hours in the evenings during the week, but I can’t say I’m actively playing with them for very long. It made me realize the level of enrichment these cats were receiving on a daily basis. In some ways they could be viewed as having fuller lives than most cats living in more traditional homes.”

That’s one reason why Arslanian would like to see more animal shelters and rescue groups be open to adopting out cats to businesses, not just traditional residences.

“Businesses could be vetted as are most adopters, and assessed to ensure the business and cat are a good fit for one another,” she said, noting that of course not all cats have personalities that would be suited to that environment.

See a selection of Marttila’s photos from the book below.

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‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Showrunner Is Already Talking About Future Seasons

Hulu’s soon-to-be-released adaption of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 dystopian classic, The Handmaid’s Tale, has yet to premiere, but that hasn’t stopped the showrunner and producers from dreaming about future seasons.

During a panel discussion that took place after a screening of the series’ first episode at Tribeca Film Festival, members of the cast and crew discussed all things “Handmaid’s Tale,” including how the source material for the adaptation of Atwood’s incredibly prescient novel leaves the door wide open for an expanded version of the story for TV. 

“When the book ends, the reaction is fury, because the way it ends is so cut off,” showrunner Bruce Miller told audiences on Friday night. “And so in some ways, immediately, the first thing you think of is ― how are we going to expand this story? Because that’s what your desire is as a reader.”

The book, he noted, is written strictly from the perspective of Offred ― one of the many handmaids living in the theocratic dictatorship known as Gilead, who are forced to function as sexual surrogates for leaders of the republic. In this indeterminate future version of the United States, sterility has become an overwhelming issue, resulting in a return to “traditional” values and widespread subjugation of women, particularly those of lower social standing who are capable of bearing children for more powerful men. 

“The book is so strictly from Offred’s point of view, that you hear about all of these amazing, interesting worlds and all of these parts of all of these things that are going on, but you don’t see any of them going on in the book,” Miller explained. “That, to me, as a TV series [showrunner], seemed like … once you create this world, you have a lot of places to go.”

“I wanted to know more,” he added. “I wanted to know what happens next. The end of the book is quite a mystery, so I get to make it up.”

The first three episodes of the Hulu series certainly center around the life of Offred (Elizabeth Moss), once a free mother and wife who’s now forced to live with, serve and produce children for a high-ranking commander in Gilead’s militant regime. But we’re also given a glimpse into the worlds of fellow handmaid Ofglen (Alexis Bledel), Offred’s best friend from college Moira (Samira Wiley), the commander’s wife Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski), handmaid trainer Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd), and even the commander himself (Joseph Fiennes).

“You might not stay with Offred the whole time,” teased “Lemonade” cinematographer Reed Morano, the director of the first three “Handmaid’s” episodes.

Executive producer Warren Littlefield was more than willing to entertain the idea of future “Handmaid’s Tale” seasons as well:

The landscape of television right now is such an exciting playground for artists. The audience asks, each and every year, to only get more complex in character and more complex in story. Look at who’s up on stage. Each and every one of these actors ― the characters that they play ― there’s so much to explore. Where a limited series is certainly thriving right now in the television landscape, Bruce has years and the struggle continues. God knows it’s relevant. So […] we’ve only scratched the surface in the first 10 hours and our hope is that we leave you with, “Oh, I have to have more.”

“The Handmaid’s Tale” will premiere on Hulu on April 26. Meantime, here are some images from the show to get you excited:

type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related… + articlesList=58e7de23e4b058f0a02f0adb,58eb8840e4b00de141050bef,58d034bee4b0ec9d29de74f5,58989258e4b0c1284f26ea2a,57bc9d60e4b00d9c3a1a67d0,5871549fe4b02b5f85891a49,58ef93ece4b0bb9638e1fcb5,58e65ba3e4b06a4cb31002e5,58d916f1e4b03787d35a6294,58c05330e4b0ed7182696155,58bf30a7e4b0d1078ca1f754

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Showrunner Is Already Talking About Future Seasons

Hulu’s soon-to-be-released adaption of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 dystopian classic, The Handmaid’s Tale, has yet to premiere, but that hasn’t stopped the showrunner and producers from dreaming about future seasons.

During a panel discussion that took place after a screening of the series’ first episode at Tribeca Film Festival, members of the cast and crew discussed all things “Handmaid’s Tale,” including how the source material for the adaptation of Atwood’s incredibly prescient novel leaves the door wide open for an expanded version of the story for TV. 

“When the book ends, the reaction is fury, because the way it ends is so cut off,” showrunner Bruce Miller told audiences on Friday night. “And so in some ways, immediately, the first thing you think of is ― how are we going to expand this story? Because that’s what your desire is as a reader.”

The book, he noted, is written strictly from the perspective of Offred ― one of the many handmaids living in the theocratic dictatorship known as Gilead, who are forced to function as sexual surrogates for leaders of the republic. In this indeterminate future version of the United States, sterility has become an overwhelming issue, resulting in a return to “traditional” values and widespread subjugation of women, particularly those of lower social standing who are capable of bearing children for more powerful men. 

“The book is so strictly from Offred’s point of view, that you hear about all of these amazing, interesting worlds and all of these parts of all of these things that are going on, but you don’t see any of them going on in the book,” Miller explained. “That, to me, as a TV series [showrunner], seemed like … once you create this world, you have a lot of places to go.”

“I wanted to know more,” he added. “I wanted to know what happens next. The end of the book is quite a mystery, so I get to make it up.”

The first three episodes of the Hulu series certainly center around the life of Offred (Elizabeth Moss), once a free mother and wife who’s now forced to live with, serve and produce children for a high-ranking commander in Gilead’s militant regime. But we’re also given a glimpse into the worlds of fellow handmaid Ofglen (Alexis Bledel), Offred’s best friend from college Moira (Samira Wiley), the commander’s wife Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski), handmaid trainer Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd), and even the commander himself (Joseph Fiennes).

“You might not stay with Offred the whole time,” teased “Lemonade” cinematographer Reed Morano, the director of the first three “Handmaid’s” episodes.

Executive producer Warren Littlefield was more than willing to entertain the idea of future “Handmaid’s Tale” seasons as well:

The landscape of television right now is such an exciting playground for artists. The audience asks, each and every year, to only get more complex in character and more complex in story. Look at who’s up on stage. Each and every one of these actors ― the characters that they play ― there’s so much to explore. Where a limited series is certainly thriving right now in the television landscape, Bruce has years and the struggle continues. God knows it’s relevant. So […] we’ve only scratched the surface in the first 10 hours and our hope is that we leave you with, “Oh, I have to have more.”

“The Handmaid’s Tale” will premiere on Hulu on April 26. Meantime, here are some images from the show to get you excited:

type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related… + articlesList=58e7de23e4b058f0a02f0adb,58eb8840e4b00de141050bef,58d034bee4b0ec9d29de74f5,58989258e4b0c1284f26ea2a,57bc9d60e4b00d9c3a1a67d0,5871549fe4b02b5f85891a49,58ef93ece4b0bb9638e1fcb5,58e65ba3e4b06a4cb31002e5,58d916f1e4b03787d35a6294,58c05330e4b0ed7182696155,58bf30a7e4b0d1078ca1f754

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Artist Shares Poignant Portrait Series On #BeingBlackAndMuslim

A portrait series inspired by a Twitter hashtag on being black and Muslim is exploring the challenges many people face at the intersection of two marginalized identities. 

Visual artist Bobby Rogers published the powerful portrait series Wednesday night on his website and social media accounts. The project was inspired by #BeingBlackAndMuslim, a Twitter conversation initiated in 2014 by the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative (MuslimARC). 

”My #BeingBlackandMuslim series was created to challenge the mainstream meaning of what it is to be ‘Muslim,’” Rogers, who identifies as Muslim, said in an email to The Huffington Post. “There is, and always has been, an erasure of Black Muslims from our historical teachings in America, just as there is an erasure of Black and Muslim cultures worldwide.”

There are more than 1.8 billion Muslims in the world, according to Pew Research Center. Muslims make up roughly 1 percent of the U.S. population, at more than three million.

American Muslims make up one of the most ethnically diverse faith communities in the country. A 2017 poll by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding found that a quarter of Muslims in the U.S. are black, with slightly smaller percentages of white, Asian and Arab Muslims.

Some of the earliest Muslims in the U.S. were African slaves, at least 10 to 15 percent of whom are believed to have been followers of Islam. But despite this long history, many black Muslims feel like their converging identities are overlooked in conversations about both racism and Islamophobia.

“The erasure of Black American Muslims undermines efforts towards developing a unified front in the face of our greatest threat,” wrote black Muslim activist Margari Hill in a 2015 HuffPost blog. “Groups working in the field must take into account the ways in which their anti-Islamophobia work alienates Black American Muslims.”

Anti-Muslim sentiment in the U.S. spiked after the September 11 attacks and has surged again in the wake of terrorist attacks at home and abroad. Much of the work being done to combat Islamophobia has centered around promoting tolerance of immigrant communities, Hill noted, which ignores the experiences of black Muslims “whose Muslim identity is homegrown.”

“With my series I want to show society that Black Muslims have always been an integral part of American history, as well as, Islamic history,” Rogers said.

The artist said his project aims to bring awareness to challenges black Muslims face “as a result of occupying the axes of two of the most marginalized groups in society.” But through exploring these challenges, Rogers said he hopes “for others to understand the true beauty & resilience of being Black and Muslim.”

“When we speak about Islam we should recognize Blackness as an equal and integral part of the conversation, and additionally, truthfully acknowledge the scope of Black Muslims throughout history.”

Scroll down to see more powerful portraits on #BeingBlackAndMuslim:

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Artist Shares Poignant Portrait Series On #BeingBlackAndMuslim

A portrait series inspired by a Twitter hashtag on being black and Muslim is exploring the challenges many people face at the intersection of two marginalized identities. 

Visual artist Bobby Rogers published the powerful portrait series Wednesday night on his website and social media accounts. The project was inspired by #BeingBlackAndMuslim, a Twitter conversation initiated in 2014 by the Muslim Anti-Racism Collaborative (MuslimARC). 

”My #BeingBlackandMuslim series was created to challenge the mainstream meaning of what it is to be ‘Muslim,’” Rogers, who identifies as Muslim, said in an email to The Huffington Post. “There is, and always has been, an erasure of Black Muslims from our historical teachings in America, just as there is an erasure of Black and Muslim cultures worldwide.”

There are more than 1.8 billion Muslims in the world, according to Pew Research Center. Muslims make up roughly 1 percent of the U.S. population, at more than three million.

American Muslims make up one of the most ethnically diverse faith communities in the country. A 2017 poll by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding found that a quarter of Muslims in the U.S. are black, with slightly smaller percentages of white, Asian and Arab Muslims.

Some of the earliest Muslims in the U.S. were African slaves, at least 10 to 15 percent of whom are believed to have been followers of Islam. But despite this long history, many black Muslims feel like their converging identities are overlooked in conversations about both racism and Islamophobia.

“The erasure of Black American Muslims undermines efforts towards developing a unified front in the face of our greatest threat,” wrote black Muslim activist Margari Hill in a 2015 HuffPost blog. “Groups working in the field must take into account the ways in which their anti-Islamophobia work alienates Black American Muslims.”

Anti-Muslim sentiment in the U.S. spiked after the September 11 attacks and has surged again in the wake of terrorist attacks at home and abroad. Much of the work being done to combat Islamophobia has centered around promoting tolerance of immigrant communities, Hill noted, which ignores the experiences of black Muslims “whose Muslim identity is homegrown.”

“With my series I want to show society that Black Muslims have always been an integral part of American history, as well as, Islamic history,” Rogers said.

The artist said his project aims to bring awareness to challenges black Muslims face “as a result of occupying the axes of two of the most marginalized groups in society.” But through exploring these challenges, Rogers said he hopes “for others to understand the true beauty & resilience of being Black and Muslim.”

“When we speak about Islam we should recognize Blackness as an equal and integral part of the conversation, and additionally, truthfully acknowledge the scope of Black Muslims throughout history.”

Scroll down to see more powerful portraits on #BeingBlackAndMuslim:

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

True ‘Harry Potter’ Fans Will Never, Ever Drink Unicorn Frappuccinos

True ‘Harry Potter’ Fans Will Never, Ever Drink Unicorn Frappuccinos

Accio any other drink at Starbucks.

On Wednesday, the popular coffee brand broke the internet when it debuted its new Unicorn Frappuccino.

The frozen drink is made with mango syrup, a sour blue drizzle, and topped with vanilla whipped cream and sweet pink and sour blue powder.

Naturally, many find the cotton-candy-colored concoction pretty magical.

But the idea of drinking the essence of a unicorn is unsettling to “Harry Potter” fans, who are quick to point out that in the beloved series by J.K. Rowling the drinking of unicorn’s blood isn’t exactly a great thing.

In fact, it’s downright despicable.

Allow this excerpt from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone to explain why the drinking of unicorn blood could make your house lose, like, 92,480,234,823,098 gazillion points:

“Only one who has nothing to lose, and everything to gain, would commit such a crime. The blood of a unicorn will keep you alive, even if you are an inch from death, but at a terrible price. You have slain something so pure and defenseless to save yourself, you will have but a half-life, a cursed life, from the moment the blood touches your lips.”

Drinking unicorn blood was one of the many ways in which Voldemort, the series’ main antagonist, keeps himself alive.

And thus, lovers of the wizarding world made their feelings about the trendy drink known on the interwebs.

Unicorn #unicornfrappuccino #harrypotter #starbucks #voldemort #humor #drink

A post shared by Serg Beret (@sergberet) on

I hope you enjoy your cursed half life. #unicornfrappuccino #lordvoldemort #unicornblood #harrypotter

A post shared by angie (@angmiracle) on

Yet, despite its taboo nature, some “Harry Potter” fans just can’t seem to help themselves from giving into the power of Starbucks.

Tastes like a sweet tart #unicornfrappuccino #harrypotter #cursedlife #halflife #unicornblood #harrypotter

A post shared by Beautiful, Spooky & Stupid. (@spookykisses) on

They must be Hufflepuffs.

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We All Have The Right To Bodily Autonomy #SAAM

We All Have The Right To Bodily Autonomy #SAAM

If anyone ever tells you that you’re a lesser human being because you don’t want to have sex with them ― cut them out of your life. We all have rights to our own bodies and we all have the right to say no. We should all have the right to autonomy over our own bodies.

When it comes to sexual activity, nothing is more powerful than the word ‘no’. If a person is trying to coax you into something you don’t want, you have the right to say no. If a person you’re with doesn’t make you feel safe enough to say no, you need to cut them out of your life.

ItsBabyJ is here to remind you that bodily autonomy is your right. Just because a person has lots of followers on social media or plays on a sports team doesn’t mean they’re entitled to your body. Reserve the right to say no and reserve the right to your own body.

There is no excuse for inappropriate sexual behaviour. That’s what Sexual Assault Awareness Month is all about. Let’s ditch the excuses and recognize that bragging about sexual assault is a problem. Get outraged about sexual assault and ensure your friends and family are asserting their bodily autonomy.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

We All Have The Right To Bodily Autonomy #SAAM

We All Have The Right To Bodily Autonomy #SAAM

If anyone ever tells you that you’re a lesser human being because you don’t want to have sex with them ― cut them out of your life. We all have rights to our own bodies and we all have the right to say no. We should all have the right to autonomy over our own bodies.

When it comes to sexual activity, nothing is more powerful than the word ‘no’. If a person is trying to coax you into something you don’t want, you have the right to say no. If a person you’re with doesn’t make you feel safe enough to say no, you need to cut them out of your life.

ItsBabyJ is here to remind you that bodily autonomy is your right. Just because a person has lots of followers on social media or plays on a sports team doesn’t mean they’re entitled to your body. Reserve the right to say no and reserve the right to your own body.

There is no excuse for inappropriate sexual behaviour. That’s what Sexual Assault Awareness Month is all about. Let’s ditch the excuses and recognize that bragging about sexual assault is a problem. Get outraged about sexual assault and ensure your friends and family are asserting their bodily autonomy.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.